Makeup Mistakes That Are Aging You

Let’s face it: Makeup makes us look and feel good. But if you’re applying it incorrectly or using the wrong products, makeup may just be aging you — rather than making you look fresh and youthful. From neglected brows to over-made-up eyes, we found 10 easy ways to nix the mistakes you just might be making.

Here are dos and don’ts to improve your makeup game and easy ways to get out of a beauty rut. Celebrity makeup artist Carol Shaw, creator of LORAC Cosmetics, offers her advice and expertise on common culprits. Are you guilty of some of these beauty blunders?

DO skip face powder

Here’s why: Most of us reach for powder to set makeup, but it also tends to magnify lines in the skin, aging us. If you can’t give up powder, try switching to a sheer translucent powder or a mineral-based one, which illuminates and brightens the skin. Expert Advice: Carol Shaw says: “As we get older skin can get very dry. Powder absorbs oil and moisture, which can be drying for women with dry skin.”Try this instead: Skip the powder or opt for a more moisturizing mineral version.

DO opt for brown eyeliner over black
Here’s why: Eyeliner is an excellent tool to open up the eyes and make them appear wider, but the color black can be too harsh. Switch to a softer shade of brown and avoid lining the lower lash line which can look overdone. Avoid a heavy hand with eyeliner – a thick liner can make upper lids look heavy.
Expert Advice: “Brown eyeliner is soft and natural-looking. Dark makeup can sometimes make you look older,” says Carol.
Try this instead: Opt for a light color liner or a neutral brown shade that’s universally flattering. We like CARGO Swimmables Eye Pencil in Pebble Beach, $18, available at Ulta.com.

DO make blush your friend
Here’s why: The right color blush can add a youthful look to a tired face, but the key is finding a shade that is just right. Women with fair and medium skin tones should look for rosy pinks and peaches, and darker skin tones look best with coral and berry shades.
Expert Advice: “A pop of healthy, rosy color on your cheeks is very youthful-looking —like a young child’s flush or like you have been working in the garden,” notes Carol. “But bright blush can look a bit harsh and unnatural, if not applied properly.”
Try this instead: Avoid bright colors and looks for a shade that is neutral, soft and sheer. We like Neutrogena Healthy Skin Custom Glow Blush & Bronzer Duo, $12.49, available at drugstore.com.

DO wear the right foundationHere’s why: No one can claim to have “perfect” skin, and foundation can work wonders on uneven skin tones. The key is the right product and the right amount of it. Using too much foundation, especially one that’s too thick, can cause the product to settle into fine lines. Avoid anything matte and be sure to prep the skin with a moisturizer and primer before applying. Expert Advice: “Choose a foundation that is right for your skin type (moisturizing, oil-free, good for sensitive skin, etc.) with the coverage you desire,” says Carol. “If you want a very natural look with sheer/medium coverage, try a CC Cream or a Tinted Moisturizer. If you want to cover imperfections look for a medium/full coverage foundation.” Try this instead:For a product that provides natural coverage and offers sun protection, we like Perricone MD No Foundation Foundation, $55, available at PerriconeMD.com.

DO fill in sparse brows
Here’s why: Eyebrow color fades as we age, so filling in over-plucked spots or fairer hair is a must in any makeup routine. Keep brows shaped and defined, and choose a pencil or gel shade that is one or two notches lighter than your natural brow color.
Expert Advice: “Brows are the frame to your face and complete your look. A fuller brow is modern and youthful,” says Carol.
Try this instead: Pencils are great for precision, but gels have longer lasting staying power. We like Anastasia Beverly Hills Dipbrow Pomade (offered in 5 shades), $18, available at Sephora.com.

DON’T over-conceal under eyes
Here’s why: While concealer seems to be the answer to erasing under eye circles and combating the look of fatigue, if used incorrectly, can actually make you look older. Too much makeup around the eye area can highlight wrinkles and lines in this delicate area. Be sure to prep the skin with a moisturizing eye cream and keep the touch light.
Expert Advice: “I like to use my finger to melt the concealer into the skin. If you pile on the concealer without blending it in, it can settle into fine lines and wrinkles,” Carol advises.
Try this instead: Look for a concealer with a lightweight texture and bonus points if it offers sun protection. We like Physician’s Formula Youthful Wear Cosmeceutical Youth-Boosting Spotless Concealer SPF 15, $12.95, available atPhysiciansFormula.com.

DON’T skip primerHere’s why: Primers are just what they sound like: They create a base by smoothing skin and ensuring that makeup stays put. Mix with foundation or tinted moisturizer or apply a light layer as the first step in your makeup routine. Expert Advice: “Primers help diminish the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles for a silky-smooth finish, plus it helps your makeup last longer,” notes Carol. Try this instead:A thin layer of a silicone-based makeup primer can fill in lines and pores, but so can natural ingredients like oatmeal and cocoa butter. We like Lush Feeling Younger skin tint, $18.95, available at Lush.usa.com.

DON’T overdo lip liner
Here’s why: Not only is the look of heavy lip liner dated (hello, ‘90s!), it can also emphasize the fine lines around the mouth. Soften the look with a liner that closely matches your lipstick or use a creamy lipstick pencil for easy application.
Expert Advice: “Overdoing lip liner can look harsh. Choose a shade that is a little darker than your natural lip color,” Carol says. “Follow your natural lip line, and if you want to make your lips look bigger, just draw slightly outside your lip line.”
Try this instead: Keep your application clean and easy with a chubby stick that has the precision of a pencil, but has the staying power and look of lipstick. We like Flower Kiss Me Twice Lip & Cheek Chubby in Rosie Posie, $9.98, available at Walmart and Walmart.com.

DON’T skip lip color
Here’s why: As we get older, we lose the pigment in our lips making lipstick that much more indispensable. That said, steer clear of anything metallic, glittery, or too dark and avoid a heavy hand when it comes to applying. Less is more.
Expert Advice: “Lip color instantly brightens and changes your whole face! Lip color is the fastest and easiest way to make yourself look pretty,” says Carol. “If you have very small lips, then darker colors might make your lips look smaller. Otherwise, I love dark lipstick for fall and winter.”
Try this instead: When in doubt, opt for a nude lipstick and look for one that offers sun protection, anti-aging, and collagen-boosting properties. We like LORAC Cosmetics Breakthrough Performance Lipstick, $22, available at Amazon.com.

DO go easy on the eye shadowHere’s why: While we’re not opposed to adding color to eyelids, it’s best to avoid bright or dark eye shadow shades, which can draw the wrong attention to the eyes. A more subtle way to play up your peepers is to play up the lashes and a precise wand ensures a non-clumpy, non-spidery lashes. Expert Advice: To be sure, Carol isn’t against shimmer or shadow on the eyes, “I think wearing eye shadow with a little soft, reflective pearl or shimmer is very pretty on the eye, at any age. And matte eye shadows are very wearable without accentuating any fine lines or wrinkles.” Try this instead: Play up your eyes by emphasizing lush lashes, but skip mascara on the lower lashes. We like CoverGirl Last Exact Mascara, $7.29, available at drugstore.com.

Meet the Expert
Having worked on the faces of Naomi Watts, Teri Hatcher, Nicole Kidman, and Debra Messing, Carol Shaw is one of Hollywood’s most called-on makeup artists. As a teenager growing up in the beauty business, Carol knew makeup artistry was her calling, and later developed a makeup and skincare line, LORAC (Carol spelled backwards). LORAC launched with 10 shades of oil and fragrance-free foundations back in 1990, and Carol’s products have built upon a reputation for being both effective and easy-to-use.

 

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HOW TO DETERMINE YOUR UNDERTONES

Skin tone is so important in choosing the right makeup, but you may be wondering just how to go about identifying your own skin tone. What should you look for? What if your skin tone seems neutral but has areas of mild discoloration or redness? The good news is that identifying your skin tone doesn’t have to be difficult.

Skin Tone Test

The skin’s undertone is the warm, cool, or neutral hue that shows through the surface color of skin.  Although the surface color of skin changes depending on sun exposure and other skin conditions like rosacea and acne, the skin’s undertone remains consistent.

Knowing whether your undertone is warm, cool or neutral is the key to ensuring that your foundatoin matches your skin and color products look natural, not contrived. When foundation doesn’t properly match skin’s undertone, the color stands out as orange to copper, pink to rose, or ashen. If makeup looks like the right color in the package but looks odd once applied, you’ve likely purchased makeup with the incorrect undertone for your skin.

There are several ways to determine your skin tone, but here are some quick methods to keep in mind:

  • If you tan easily and do not burn, your skin’s natural melanin (the pigment that gives skin its color) level is higher, and you most likely have a yellow-to-olive, warm undertone. This is true for most African-American and women of Indian descent. Some African-American women with deep ebony skin tones may actually have a cool (bluish) undertone, so dark copper shades look off but espresso-type shades match perfectly.
  • Those who burn and either tan minimally or not at all have significantly less melanin, which results in a pink, bluish-red, or ruddy cooler undertone. In addition, look for telltale signs: a ruddy skin tone has obvious signs of redness or is one that tends to flush easily. Some neutral skin tones fall into this category, particularly if rosacea is a factor, so experiment with cool to neutral tones to see what works best for you.
  • Olive skin tones tend to look somewhat ashen or gray, from the combination of the natural yellow undertone everyone has and the greenish hue that’s unique to olive skin of any depth. Neutral tones tend to work best, but experiment with warm tones as well, as you may fall somewhere in between.
  • Neutral skin tones are those with no obvious overtones of olive, sallow, or pink. People with this skin tone tend to have the easiest time finding foundation, concealer, and powders that are just right for them. In fact, those with neutral skin tones may find they can easily wear more than one shade in any given foundation lineup.
  • The shortcut test: Some people like to rely on the color of their veins: Look at the veins on the inside of your wrist. If your veins appear blue/purple you are in the cool-toned (bluish) spectrum. If your veins appear green, you are in the warm-toned (yellow) spectrum. Those with neutral undertones will have difficulty discerning the blue/green.

These categories hold true for all women, including women of color; your underlying skin color will always relate to one of these skin tones. You may have been told that you are a particular “season” and your wardrobe and makeup colors should be a specific undertone, either cool (blue or pink tones) or warm (yellow or sallow/olive tones). Unfortunately, the rampant misinformation surrounding skin tone can be misleading when it comes to choosing your most flattering makeup shades.

Shopping for Foundation

When you’re testing foundation shades, it is critical to identify your underlying skin tone and find a foundation that matches it. This can be tricky because your underlying skin color may not be what you see on the surface. For example, you may have a ruddy (red) or ashen (gray) skin tone on the surface but your underlying skin tone is actually slightly yellow to beige. You want to neutralize whatever overtones are present with a neutral- to slightly yellow-toned foundation, thus matching the skin’s natural undertone.

Why a slightly yellow undertone? Because skin color, more often than not, always has a yellow undertone: that’s just what the natural color the predominant form of melanin (skin pigment) tends to be. For the most part, regardless of your race, nationality, or age, your foundation should be some shade of neutral ivory, sand, neutral beige, tan, dark brown, bronze brown, or ebony, with a slight undertone of yellow but without anyobvious orange, pink, rose, green, ash, or blue. Adding those colors to a foundation is never flattering and can look obvious and contrived.

There are a few exceptions to this guideline: Native North American or South American women, a tiny percentage of African-American women, and some Polynesian women do indeed have a red cast to their skin. In those instances the information about neutral foundations should be ignored. Because their skin has a slightly reddish cast, they need to look for foundations that have a slightly reddish cast to them—but that’s only a hint of brownish red, and not copper, orange, or peach.

Regardless of which of these categories you fall into, trying foundation on and making it sure it matches your skin exactly (especially in daylight) is the best way to get a color that looks natural, not like you’re wearing foundation or, even worse, a mask.

Choosing Makeup Colors

Flipping through the pages of a fashion magazine is great way to determine which colors work best with your skin tone.

  • Redheads with fair to medium skin tones like Susan Sarandon, Nicole Kidman, and Julianne Moore tend to wear corals, salmon, browns, ambers, bronze, and other earth tones.
  • Blondes with fair skin to medium skin tones like Gwyneth Paltrow, Emma Stone, and Kirsten Dunst favor a range of pink shades.
  • Brunettes with fair to medium skin tones like Julia Roberts and Jennifer Garner are often seen in light rose and soft red shades.
  • Women with dark brown hair and fair to medium skin tones like Demi Moore, Sandra Bullock, and Penelope Cruz wear more vivid shades of rose and cherry.
  • Black hair and deeper skin tones such as Halle Berry and Zoe Saldana or Oprah Winfrey wear soft natural tones such as nude pinks, soft browns, and corals.

It is also easy to see that there are exceptions to the rule and as a change of pace all kinds of color combinations (not to mention changes in hair color) are typical. In other words, choosing color can be as diverse and versatile as changing your clothes. To be safe, stay with the basics listed above, but in truth, anything goes as long as it is worn in balance and the colors work together.

Health Benefits Of Honey

honey

 

1. Prevent cancer and heart disease:
Honey contains flavonoids, antioxidants which help reduce the risk of some cancers and heart disease.

2. Reduce ulcers and other gastrointestinal disorders.
Recent research shows that honey treatment may help disorders such as ulcers and bacterial gastroenteritis. This may be related to the 3rd benefit…

3. Anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-fungal:
“All honey is antibacterial, because the bees add an enzyme that makes hydrogen peroxide,” said Peter Molan, director of the Honey Research Unit at the University of Waikato in New Zealand.

4. Increase athletic performance.
Ancient Olympic athletes would eat honey and dried figs to enhance their performance. This has now been verified with modern studies, showing that it is superior in maintaining glycogen levels and improving recovery time than other sweeteners.

5. Reduce cough and throat irritation:
Honey helps with coughs, particularly buckwheat honey. In a study of 110 children, a single dose of buckwheat honey was just as effective as a single dose of dextromethorphan in relieving nocturnal cough and allowing proper sleep.

6. Balance the 5 elements:
Honey has been used in ayurvedic medicine in India for at least 4000 years and is considered to affect all three of the body’s primitive material imbalances positively. It is also said to be useful useful in improving eyesight, weight loss, curing impotence and premature ejaculation, urinary tract disorders, bronchial asthma, diarrhea, and nausea.

Honey is referred as “Yogavahi” since it has a quality of penetrating the deepest tissues of the body. When honey is used with other herbal preparations, it enhances the medicinal qualities of those preparations and also helps them to reach the deeper tissues.

7. Blood sugar regulation:
Even though honey contains simple sugars, it is NOT the same as white sugar or artificial sweeteners. Its exact combination of fructose and glucose actually helps the body regulate blood sugar levels. Some honeys have a low hypoglycemic index, so they don’t jolt your blood sugar. (Watch this video Sweetener Comparison where I compare stevia, brown rice syrup, honey, molasses and agave, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each.)

8. Heal wounds and burns:
External application of honey has been shown to be as effective as conventional treatment with silver sulfadiazene. It is speculated that the drying effect of the simple sugars and honey’s anti-bacterial nature combine to create this effect.

9. Probiotic:
Some varieties of honey possess large amounts of friendly bacteria. This includes up to 6 species of lactobacilli and 4 species of bifidobacteria. This may explain many of the “mysterious therapeutic properties of honey.”

10. Beautiful skin:
Its anti-bacterial qualities are particularly useful for the skin, and, when used with the other ingredients, can also be moisturizing and nourishing! For a powerful home beauty treatment for which you probably have all the ingredients in your kitchen already, read Carrot Face Mask.

Different honeys have different flavonoid profiles, depending on the floral source of the nectar.

Types of Honey (most popular)

Alfalfa
Blueberry
Buckwheat
Clover
Manuka
Orange Blossom
Wildflower
There are at least 40 types – each one has distinctive taste and unique properties.
Darker honey tends to have higher antioxidant levels.
Monofloral honey (honey from a single plant species) usually has the lowest glycemic index (GI). For example, locust honey from the Black Locust tree has a GI of 32. Clover honey, which is used commercially, has the highest glycemic index at 69.

Honey Suggestions:

If you want to get the goodness from your honey, make sure it is pure and raw.
Raw honey contains vitamins, minerals and enzymes not present in refined honey.

Honey Cautions:

Best not to feed to infants. Spores of Clostridium botulinum have been found in a small percentage of honey in North America. This is not dangerous to adults and older children, but infants can have a serious reaction of illness in the first year. Do not add honey to baby food or use as a soother to quiet a fussy or colicky baby. Most Canadian honey is not contaminated with the bacteria causing infant botulism, but it’s still best not to take the chance.
Honey is a sugar, so do not eat jars full of it if you value your good health and want to maintain a healthy weight. It has a high caloric value and will put you on a sugar high and low.
To cook with honey or not: There is some controversy about cooking with honey, although I cannot substantiate it from all of my research about honey.

“…when honey is heated above 108 degrees Fahrenheit, it becomes transformed into a glue-like substance that is extremely difficult to digest. This substance is considered a toxin (ama), since it adheres to the tissues of the body and is very difficult to remove.” (quote from the Ayurveda Wellness Center)

That said, I am not convinced that we should not cook with honey, although I am not using it in most of my cooked recipes until I get to the bottom of this

Youthful, Natural Makeup Tips: Application Hints & Tricks For a Fresh, Young Face

Did you know the cosmetics you use could be making you look years older than you actually are? Many women instantly assume makeup takes years from their “face age”. However, when done incorrectly makeup can actually make your face appear to be much older than it is. Use these tips and secrets to help you look younger at all times!

Wrinkles Happen, but Don’t Cover Them Up with Heavy Makeup

When it comes to skin care, most women focus on reducing the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. Although you might not be able to completely cover your already present wrinkles, there are a few things you can do to make them less noticeable. The most important thing to remember is to keep it light!

Fresh, clean skin always appears full of youth. While you might be tempted pile on concealer and foundation, be warned. Adding layers of makeup on top of these fine lines can be a mistake! Instead, choose a light weight oil free beauty products to give your skin a slight tint. It will give you just enough coverage, without caking in your wrinkle areas. Natural makeup with added moisture is most important when it comes to concealing fine lines. In addition, the extra moisture can help you prevent more lines from appearing in the future.

Brighten Under Eyes with Concealer Applied the Right Way

Another area of concern when trying to look more youthful is the under-eye area. The skin under your eyes is some of the most delicate skin on your body. Therefore, it can easily show wear and tear from stress and skin-abuse. To brighten up the eye area, consider using a small amount of concealer directly under your eye. This can help you with under-eye circles. Use a tint one-shade lighter than your foundation and blend it well. To apply the concealer (or any other product to this area of your face) be sure to use your ring finger and pat the product on. Your ring finger will apply the least amount of pressure. Other fingers can be too rough and actually damage the delicate skin in the area.

After applying the concealer and a light dusting of powder, use a light colored eye shadow all over your lid. Dab a bit of the shadow in the corner area of your eye (next to the bridge of your nose) and a bit under your bottom eye lashes as well. This will help your eyes look bright and youthful. Finish with a bit of mascara and you’re ready to go!

Secrets for Youthful, Fresh Lips & Cheeks

Just because you’re aging doesn’t mean you should pile on the red lipstick! Sure, it may be appropriate in some instances but not for everyday wear. You may not be dealing with blemishes (like a teenager) but you may be dealing with a lipstick crisis! To look younger, choose a dewy lipstick-gloss combination. Most brands (such as Sephora, Clinique and Loreal) are all offering this type of lipstick. It gives you a hint of color, without going matte. The shiny or “dew” of this lip choice instantly adds youth to your face.

For the cheeks, stick with a natural and light blush. Mineral blushes are often fool-proof and natural in color. Apply a bit to the apples of your cheeks and go! Remember, it’s easier to start with a little bit of blush and add more rather than adding too much blush and trying to tone it down. A quick hint: If you add too much blush, use your powder to lightly dust the area, toning down the intensity of the color.

The Natural Way to a Younger Look

Overall, there’s no steadfast advice or answers when it comes to looking younger. While a facial or a microdermabrasion session might help you on a monthly basis, choosing the right makeup and age-appropriate application techniques can help you daily! So, remember to keep it light and dewy for the youngest look possible.

Tips On Skin Care: Cleansing, Moisturizing and Anti-Aging

To keep your face looking as youthful as possible, you need to proper skin care. Here I show you how to properly cleanse, exfoliate and moisturize your skin while never leaving the house without at least 30 SPF sunscreen. I’ve dubbed this process “The Basic 4-Step Skincare Regimen,” which I outline in this article. I also include organic skincare tips for the growing number of you who are concerned with putting only natural, organic products on your skin.

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How you care for your skin is utterly dependent on the type of skin you have:

oily, normal/combination, dry, sensitive or sun- damaged.

The Basic 4-Step Skincare Regimen

Step 1: Cleansing
You need to find a good cleanser that your skin responds well to, and stick with it: See the best cleansers for your skin type. You can find a good cleanser at the drugstore. There’s no need to spend $40 on a fancy wash. Avoid bar soaps as they tend to dry out the skin. According to Rona Berg, in her book, “Beauty,” a French cosmetics executive once told her, “Soap should only ever touch your skin from the neck down.” I agree. Choose a creamy cleanser if you have dry skin or a clear cleanser if you have oily skin.

For you organic types, you can cleanse skin with milk or yogurt (who knew?).

Be careful not to cleanse too often, you risk over-cleansing skin, see signs you are over cleansing your skin. You really only need to wash your face at night to remove makeup and sunscreen, which can clog pores. If you have dry skin, conorganicsider cold cream like Pond’s, which the French use or make your own organic cold cream using this simple cold cream recipe. Simply apply cream, then wipe off, no water needed (if you have hard water, it can be especially harsh on skin). Most women prefer the water method: Use warm water to loosen dirt and clogged pores. Use a dime-sized bit of cleanser, then rinse with cool or lukewarm water. I personally swear by my Clarisonic Mia, as does pretty much everyone I know who has one.

Make sure to remove eye makeup with a proper makeup remover. The area around the eye is delicate so don’t pull or rub too hard. You can also use olive oil as a natural eye makeup remover. Find out more in Use Olive Oil as an Eye Makeup Remover.

In the morning, a splash of lukewarm water is all you need (I find it’s great for removing excess oils from your nightly moisturizing). Never wash your face with hot or cold water (both can cause broken capillaries).

Step 2: Exfoliate
Exfoliation is the step most people skip in their weekly skincare routine. But trust me, if you start properly exfoliating your skin, you will notice an almost immediate difference. According to Berg, one of the reasons men’s skin looks more youthful than women’s is because men tend to exfoliate daily when they shave.
In my article, How to Exfoliate, I share all my tips and tricks to proper exfoliation. Including why you should throw out the loofah.

There are several exfoliating options that I use weekly.
A facial scrub. You can buy a great scrub or make your own. I prefer sugar scrubs to salt ones, but it’s just a matter of preference. See my list of the best facial scrubs or try out a recipe using brown sugar and coconut oil in Make a Face & Body Scrub With Sugar and Oil.
A washcloth. Put a dab of cleanser and a sprinkle of white refined sugar on a damp washcloth and massage skin in a circular motion. After a quick rinse, any sign of dead skin is erased. If you have dry skin, try extra virgin coconut oil.
Microdermabrasion. You can buy microdermabrasion kits. I have and found quite a few I like. See my list of the best facial scrubs and microdermabrasion kits.
Chemical peels. In the hour it takes to get a chemical peel, you can take a year from your face. Can’t afford the price tag for a monthly peel? Try some over-the-counter peels that work over the course of a month. I prefer MD Skincare’s.
Retinoids. Retinoid (such as Retin-A or the more moisturizing Renova) also work by removing the top layer of dead skin cells while also generating collagen in the skin. “Collagen is the skin’s structural fiber,” dermatologist Dennis Gross said in O Magazine. “As we get older, it breaks down, creating lines and large pores.” Skincare experts disagree on all sorts of things, but most of them consider retinoids to be a miracle skin saver. I’m addicted to Retin-A, which I pick up in Mexico on my yearly jaunts.
Should you use a toner? Some people swear by toners, but many beauty experts do not (I once read a skincare expert claim, “toners are only for copy machines”). Toners are meant to remove all remaining traces of oil, makeup and dirt, but a good cleanser should do this. I firmly believe it’s up to you. If you like the way your skin feels with a toner. Buy it. Use it. Enjoy it.
Step 3: Moisturize
While I know of at least one famous beauty editor who swore skin doesn’t need moisturizer, basically everyone else I’ve read disagrees and is an adamant believer in it. A basic rule of beauty is that if you have dry skin, you should invest in a basic moisturizer. So how much should you moisturize? Your skin will tell you. When your skin is tight, it’s crying out for moisture. Be careful not to over-moisturize — this can clog pores.
See my list of the best moisturizers on the market. For you natural girls, nothing beats a good oil for your skin. You can use extra virgin coconut oil, olive oil, sweet almond oil or jojoba oil. Learn more in Organic Extra Virgin Coconut Oil as Overall Body Moisturizer.

Are eye creams necessary? Well maybe. Some beauty experts strongly recommend eye creams. Why? The skin around the eye contains no fatty tissue and is therefore very thin and susceptible to wrinkles. Special eye creams are formulated to “thicken” this area. Yet other experts (including the beauty editors of Allure in their new book) claim your daily lotion works around the eyes just as well.

Step 4: Apply Sunscreen
The #1 cause of wrinkles is sun damage, so it’s important to use a sunscreen of at least 30 SPF from your early years on even in winter and on cloudy days. A great trick is to purchase two moisturizers: One for night and one for day that includes UV protection. Don’t use moisturizers with sunscreen at night, the ingredients are not meant to be used 27/7 and can aggravate skin. When choosing a sunscreen, make sure it contains Mexoryl (found in my favorite sunscreen La-Roche Posay) or Helioplex, found in Neutrogena products.