Masquerade & Zulu Palette By Juvia’s

Such beautiful and bold eye color palette made to be creative on the eye area for any event. The packaging is just too cute with an African Queen on the cover, not to mention most of the products are vegan. I purchased ( ZULU & MASQUERADE) Monday, and it arrived Thursday. This eyeshadow have occurred with amazing reviews and YouTube tutorials on how well this eye pigment works.

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Juvia’s Place took the beauty world by storm, swatched by every big YouTuber and used in dozens of vibrant, colorful tutorials. It sold out quickly, as fans went crazy for the highly pigmented, 9-shade palette. Now, the brand surprised us all by launching two new eye-shadow palettes that look just as amazing as the Zulu.

The palettes just showed up online. The Zulu Eye Shadow Palette (above, left) has nine bold shades, including a burnt orange, navy blue, yellow, and wine hue. There are six matte shades and three metallic shimmers.  There are both warm and cool tones to play around with. I honestly can’t get over how pretty these are. There are an infinite number of epic looks you can create with these colors, especially when you know how pigmented these shadows really are. Plus, the packaging is as beautiful as always.

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A 16-colour eyeshadow palette.

With a selection of cool and warm toned shades, The Masquerade Palette is inspired by festivities usually filled with beautiful and striking color. 16 richly pigmented colors, created and formulated to beautifully elevate your gorgeous qualities.  The highly-pigmented shades can be applied wet or dry and worn throughout day and night to create beautifully intense looks.

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HOW TO DETERMINE YOUR UNDERTONES

Skin tone is so important in choosing the right makeup, but you may be wondering just how to go about identifying your own skin tone. What should you look for? What if your skin tone seems neutral but has areas of mild discoloration or redness? The good news is that identifying your skin tone doesn’t have to be difficult.

Skin Tone Test

The skin’s undertone is the warm, cool, or neutral hue that shows through the surface color of skin.  Although the surface color of skin changes depending on sun exposure and other skin conditions like rosacea and acne, the skin’s undertone remains consistent.

Knowing whether your undertone is warm, cool or neutral is the key to ensuring that your foundatoin matches your skin and color products look natural, not contrived. When foundation doesn’t properly match skin’s undertone, the color stands out as orange to copper, pink to rose, or ashen. If makeup looks like the right color in the package but looks odd once applied, you’ve likely purchased makeup with the incorrect undertone for your skin.

There are several ways to determine your skin tone, but here are some quick methods to keep in mind:

  • If you tan easily and do not burn, your skin’s natural melanin (the pigment that gives skin its color) level is higher, and you most likely have a yellow-to-olive, warm undertone. This is true for most African-American and women of Indian descent. Some African-American women with deep ebony skin tones may actually have a cool (bluish) undertone, so dark copper shades look off but espresso-type shades match perfectly.
  • Those who burn and either tan minimally or not at all have significantly less melanin, which results in a pink, bluish-red, or ruddy cooler undertone. In addition, look for telltale signs: a ruddy skin tone has obvious signs of redness or is one that tends to flush easily. Some neutral skin tones fall into this category, particularly if rosacea is a factor, so experiment with cool to neutral tones to see what works best for you.
  • Olive skin tones tend to look somewhat ashen or gray, from the combination of the natural yellow undertone everyone has and the greenish hue that’s unique to olive skin of any depth. Neutral tones tend to work best, but experiment with warm tones as well, as you may fall somewhere in between.
  • Neutral skin tones are those with no obvious overtones of olive, sallow, or pink. People with this skin tone tend to have the easiest time finding foundation, concealer, and powders that are just right for them. In fact, those with neutral skin tones may find they can easily wear more than one shade in any given foundation lineup.
  • The shortcut test: Some people like to rely on the color of their veins: Look at the veins on the inside of your wrist. If your veins appear blue/purple you are in the cool-toned (bluish) spectrum. If your veins appear green, you are in the warm-toned (yellow) spectrum. Those with neutral undertones will have difficulty discerning the blue/green.

These categories hold true for all women, including women of color; your underlying skin color will always relate to one of these skin tones. You may have been told that you are a particular “season” and your wardrobe and makeup colors should be a specific undertone, either cool (blue or pink tones) or warm (yellow or sallow/olive tones). Unfortunately, the rampant misinformation surrounding skin tone can be misleading when it comes to choosing your most flattering makeup shades.

Shopping for Foundation

When you’re testing foundation shades, it is critical to identify your underlying skin tone and find a foundation that matches it. This can be tricky because your underlying skin color may not be what you see on the surface. For example, you may have a ruddy (red) or ashen (gray) skin tone on the surface but your underlying skin tone is actually slightly yellow to beige. You want to neutralize whatever overtones are present with a neutral- to slightly yellow-toned foundation, thus matching the skin’s natural undertone.

Why a slightly yellow undertone? Because skin color, more often than not, always has a yellow undertone: that’s just what the natural color the predominant form of melanin (skin pigment) tends to be. For the most part, regardless of your race, nationality, or age, your foundation should be some shade of neutral ivory, sand, neutral beige, tan, dark brown, bronze brown, or ebony, with a slight undertone of yellow but without anyobvious orange, pink, rose, green, ash, or blue. Adding those colors to a foundation is never flattering and can look obvious and contrived.

There are a few exceptions to this guideline: Native North American or South American women, a tiny percentage of African-American women, and some Polynesian women do indeed have a red cast to their skin. In those instances the information about neutral foundations should be ignored. Because their skin has a slightly reddish cast, they need to look for foundations that have a slightly reddish cast to them—but that’s only a hint of brownish red, and not copper, orange, or peach.

Regardless of which of these categories you fall into, trying foundation on and making it sure it matches your skin exactly (especially in daylight) is the best way to get a color that looks natural, not like you’re wearing foundation or, even worse, a mask.

Choosing Makeup Colors

Flipping through the pages of a fashion magazine is great way to determine which colors work best with your skin tone.

  • Redheads with fair to medium skin tones like Susan Sarandon, Nicole Kidman, and Julianne Moore tend to wear corals, salmon, browns, ambers, bronze, and other earth tones.
  • Blondes with fair skin to medium skin tones like Gwyneth Paltrow, Emma Stone, and Kirsten Dunst favor a range of pink shades.
  • Brunettes with fair to medium skin tones like Julia Roberts and Jennifer Garner are often seen in light rose and soft red shades.
  • Women with dark brown hair and fair to medium skin tones like Demi Moore, Sandra Bullock, and Penelope Cruz wear more vivid shades of rose and cherry.
  • Black hair and deeper skin tones such as Halle Berry and Zoe Saldana or Oprah Winfrey wear soft natural tones such as nude pinks, soft browns, and corals.

It is also easy to see that there are exceptions to the rule and as a change of pace all kinds of color combinations (not to mention changes in hair color) are typical. In other words, choosing color can be as diverse and versatile as changing your clothes. To be safe, stay with the basics listed above, but in truth, anything goes as long as it is worn in balance and the colors work together.

Everyday Beauty Questions

What is the best makeup for oily skin?

Oily skin is tough to deal with especially in the summer.  My fix:  oil free primer and Make Up For Ever HD foundation powder.I know Mary Kay has a good mattifier, and I like Bare Escentuals foundation as it soaks up all the extra oil.  Keep blotting sheets with you for touch ups throughout the day.

Should you match your eyeshadow color to your clothes?

NO!  If you’re wearing a green shirt, don’t wear green eyeshadow- it’s too matchy matchy.  Instead, choose something that is opposite on the color wheel.  My biggest tip:  the brighter the clothes, the more neutral color the makeup- this doesn’t mean you need to do a simple look… You can wear a dramatic look if you have a bright pink top on, but go with a black smokey eye or a brown smudged look instead of something with color.  If you are wearing black, brown, or another neutral, then go with a brighter color for the eyes or lips for that “pop”.

 

How do I cover up acne?

Use concealer that is 1-2 shades darker than your skin.  If you use a light concealer, it’s only going to enhance the acne instead of actually hiding it.  The trick is to blend around the edges or apply foundation over the concealer to smooth out the color difference.  If you have redness from the acne, use a green concealer as it counteracts redness- you do need to apply foundation on top though so you don’t look like Kermit….

My favorite concealers:   Coastal Scents Camo Quad,  Make Up For Ever cream concealer, and Bobbi Brown Concealer (for under the eyes)

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How do you do your eyebrows?

I used to take a stiff angled brow brush and matte eyeshadow around the same color as my brows and fill in.  For the blank spots, I’ll take a dry feeling brow or eyeliner pencil and do small strokes to fill in.  But, recently I’ve fallen in love with Tarte’s Brow Mousse- it’s so easy to use and so natural looking, plus it lasts all day!

I do recommend for shaping the brows that you go 4 times a year to have them professionally shaped- Makeup artist, estheticians and hair stylists do brows on a regular basis and can analyze and create a shape that suits you as each person’s face and brows are different.  Then you can just tweeze or wax in between shapings…

How can I avoid looking pale in pictures?

If you know you’re having pictures done, wear extra makeup- especially for blush, lips, and lashes as the flash will wash you out.  If you feel you have just a little too much makeup on, then it’s probably just right for pictures.

Tips for Making Small Eyes Look Bigger

You should start by concentrating on your brows. Shape them so they don’t have the close-together appearance. Next, use a soft red-brown brow pencil or a taupe powder brow liner – don’t make the mistake of going too dark with your brow color, as this looks very unnatural and will make your skin look paler. Use eye shadow on the upper outer half of the lid extending above the eye and under the brow. To offset the closeness of the eyes, start drawing the eye line on the upper lid away from the inner corner. Draw it up and out. Similarly, the lower line should not begin from the inner corner. For your coloring, try a pale champagne for the entire lid and medium brown, kaki or plum for the crease and corner. Use brown/black eyeliner to define your eyes and smudge lightly. Finish with black mascara, making sure to use an eyelash curler first.

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Best Beauty Blogs in 2015

Blackheads are just pimples that don’t have skin over them. That’s all they are. Because there’s no skin, and they’re exposed to the air, the top layer of gunk in your pores oxidizes and turns that darkish black color.
All you have to do is clean out your pores, and the blackheads are gone. There’s no need to squish and squeeze.
If you’re prone to blackheads, I have some good and bad news for you. The bad news is, large pores and oily skin are going to be a fact of life for you. The likelihood that you’ll be able to totally reverse either of those things is nil.
The good news is, people with oily skin and large pores don’t wrinkle as quickly (because our skin is VERY good at replenishing the oils). So when you’re 60, this will be a blessing.

1. Make Exfoliation and Microdermabrasion a Part of Your Weekly Ritual

There are so many things you can use to exfoliate and remove blackheads with. All of them are in your cabinets right now.
Especially for oily skin and getting rid of blackheads. Nutmeg helps get rid of the oil, offers the scrubby power, and leaves behind really smooth skin. The lactic acid in milk helps break down old skin cells so they disappear when you rinse your face. If you really want to take it up a notch, use buttermilk instead of regular milk (it contains even more lactic acid).
You could also use: Baking soda and water, lemon juice and sugar, or salt and sour cream.
How you do it: Simply combine your “scrubby” ingredient with your liquid/wet ingredient until you have a thin paste. Starting with a clean face, rinse it once with water, and then begin to apply your exfoliator in light, circular motions.
Concentrate on the blackheads, but remember to use a very light touch. Too rough, and you could damage your skin.
Do this for 3-5 minutes. Rinse well. Enjoy your clean face.

2. Do a Honey Pat-Down

This is only slightly different than the honey face wash, in that you don’t want to wet your face before you start – in any way, shape, or form. (Although you do want to have a clean face before beginning.)
Your honey should be very, very sticky if you want this to be as effective as possible.
Simply pour a small amount of honey on your fingers and start rapidly patting the areas on your face where you want to remove blackheads. The honey will stick to the stuff in your pores, and pull it out as you remove your fingers. It will also offer gentle antibacterial and antioxidant support, so any small remnants that may be left in your pores won’t oxidize (and turn black) quite as quickly.
Continue doing this for 3 or so minutes, and then just rinse your face with water.

3. Use Egg Whites to Pull Out the Gunk

Frankly, this is one of my least favorite ways to get rid of blackheads (I don’t particularly like the way eggs on my face smell, and it hasn’t been as effective as the other ways for me).
However, hundreds of other people swear by this method, thus I include it for your consideration. It’s a prime example of how one crunchy remedy may work for one person, and not at all for another. You never, ever, ever know until you try.
How to pull out the blackheads with an egg white mask: Starting with a clean face, spread egg whites all over using your fingers or a paintbrush. Start first with one thin layer and let it dry briefly. Then spread a second layer over the top and let the whole thing dry completely.
You may want to focus on the blackhead areas a third time, even.
Allow this mask to dry for 15 minutes. Your face will feel tight and pull a bit. This is good. Then, with a warm, wet washcloth, scrub the egg whites off your face very gently.
If nothing else, your face WILL be super smooth and soft. (And probably a little more porcelain (edit: or uniform regardless of skin tone) in color for a while, too, which is a fun bonus.)

4. Use a Cosmetic Clay Mask to Soak Up the Oils

If egg whites were my least favorite, clays are my absolute #1 favorite way to get rid of blackheads.
You do not have to have a special $50 jar of facial mask clay for this. You do not have to put essential oil into your mask (if you don’t want to, but you can).
All you need is cosmetic clay and water (or apple cider vinegar, which is how I like to do it).
Where do you get cosmetic clay? Mountain Rose Herbs carries a variety of it at very reasonable prices (bentonite, french green, rhassoul, and fuller’s earth). But if you have a local herb shop, the chances are, they’ll have some there, too.
How to make a blackhead-busting mask with clay: Again, you can add goodies like rosewater or a drop or two of essential oils to your clay, but this is not necessary for removing blackheads.
So the basics are: Combine 1 Tbsp clay with 1 Tbsp apple cider vinegar (or pure water) and stir until you have a paste without lumps in it. Spread over your whole clean face, or just the areas where you have blackheads. Allow this to dry for 15-20 minutes.
Take a warm, wet washcloth and press it to the mask for a few seconds, and then slowly and gently wipe off.

5. If All Else Fails, Take a Clean Toothbrush to the Area

Do not use this method unless all else fails.
This is absolutely the most extreme measure you should go to in clearing your blackheads (with squishing and squeezing being THE most extreme measure there is).
Use a dedicated toothbrush only for blackhead cleaning. Do NOT use your mouth toothbrush (ew) ever. In between scrubbing blackheads, dunk your toothbrush in a glass of hydrogen peroxide to keep it clean.
How to do this: Using a soft bristled brush (NOTHING FIRMER), pour a small amount of lemon juice on the toothbrush, along with a drop or two of oily-skin friendly oil like jojoba, tamanu, or neem.
VERY gently scrub your blackhead areas with the head of your toothbrush. You can rinse with water and reapply with lemon and oil if you feel like you need to. Just do this gently. In circular motions. And don’t go crazy.
Also, don’t do this more than once a week. Don’t do it around your eyes. And do NOT do this on any open sores, scratches, or cuts. Ever. Promise?
If you avoid anywhere delicate, it should be just fine. I just wanted to be overly dramatic, so you understand that you shouldn’t brush your whole face with lemon juice and a toothbrush.

An Ounce of Prevention…

… pound of cure and all that.
Here are a few ways you can prevent blackheads before they happen. Maybe not always and forever, but most of the time.
(I have noticed approximately 3 blackheads on my nose in the last three months, down from seeing them almost every day two years ago, if that makes you feel better.)
Ways to prevent blackheads:
  • Don’t wash your face with harsh cleansers. This makes your skin overreact and produce more oil, which means your blackheads will be back much faster.
  • DO wash your face twice a day with natural sources. (Say, the no-nonsense daily scrub in the morning and the honey wash with baking soda in the evening.)
  • Wear makeup as little as possible.
  • Wash your pillowcase on a weekly basis (to clean off any dead skin cells and oils your face leaves behind on it).
  • Use an astringent like witch hazel or apple cider vinegar after you wash your face and before you moisturize (this will help get rid of any residual gunkiness and tighten the pores a bit).
  • Once every two weeks, use a facial steam to help open your pores and let them unclog.
  • Consider using the oil cleansing method to wash your face (pop over and read this thread in the Crunchy Community to see why).
  • Make a homemade peel-off mask with gelatin and tomato juice.
  • Blot your face with tissue paper throughout the day to soak up oil before it can accumulate.