The Truth about Avocado Oil for Hair Growth

Can avocado oil actually help with hair growth and just what is in it that makes it so good for your hair?

Despite many websites giving a long list of vitamins, minerals, omega-3 fats and amino acids supposedly in avocado oil. And then giving reasons why all of these nutrients are responsible for its hair growth properties, the truth about using avocado oil on your hair is actually much simpler and more powerful.

First a little cleanup of some of the avocado oil hair growth myths out there.

awh4

Online Myths About Avocado Oil

Firstly, avocado oil is not a significant source of protein. It is an oil after all and the whole purpose of extracting an oil is the removal of proteins, carbohydrates and any other substances that aren’t fat based. Take a look at the nutritional information on a bottle of it and you will usually see the protein content listed as zero.

While fresh avocados are a great source of vitamins and minerals, the oil itself does not contain the same sort of broad spectrum of these nutrients.

Even a good cold pressed avocado oil like this, with its gentle manufacturing process, is still created by separating the oil from the rest of the pulp. Obviously, many water soluble vitamins like vitamins C and the B vitamins will be largely removed. Fat soluble vitamins on the other hand, and one in particular as we shall see, are concentrated instead.

Finally, while it does contain some omega-3 alpha linolenic fatty acids, the amount is relatively small (taking a good fish oil or using flaxseed oil on your hair is your best bet here). Far more important, from a hair benefits point of view, is the extremely high content of monounsaturated fatty acids in avocado oil.

Avocado Oil Hair Growth Nutrients

The monounsaturated fatty acid content in avocado oil is even higher than extra virgin olive oil and is one of the main reasons it is so good for your hair.

Many people’s hair is dry, damaged and weak from poor nutrition, heat styling, chemical treatments and environmental pollution. Monounsaturated fats, when applied directly in a hair mask, can moisturize, nourish and strengthen hair strands, improving the way they look and protecting them from damage.

Massaging avocado oil into your scalp also stimulates blood flow to your hair follicles. With improved blood flow and circulation to the scalp, more nutrients can reach the follicles to stimulate new growth and healthier hair in general.

Finally, and perhaps most beneficially for hair care, its monounsaturated fatty acids, phytosterols and high levels of antioxidants like vitamin E, are well absorbed into our scalp and hair shafts. This not only has a highly moisturizing and protective effect against environmental stressors and damage, it may also stimulate new growth and help unclog blocked follicles.

The combination of antioxidant vitamin E, moisturizing plants sterols and the rich levels of monounsaturated fatty acids in avocado oil, provides three different nutrients that have been individually recommended for stimulating hair growth, in one simple, highly absorbable topical treatment.

While there are no clinical trials I’m aware of (and are unlikely to be since pharmaceutical companies can’t patent natural treatments), many people report positive results with using avocado oil for hair growth.

3 Ways to Use Avocado Oil for Better Hair

Applying a high quality cold pressed avocado oil to your hair will improve its appearance and texture while strengthening and moisturizing the strands. See the page on treatments for some simple homemade ideas that are likely to be far more effective than your expensive store bought conditioners.

Massaging avocado oil into your scalp stimulates circulation and allows it to penetrate in deeply, providing beneficial nutrients, unclogging blocked follicles and, it is reported for many people, stimulating new growth.

Last but not least, use the oil for healthier cooking and as a recipe addition or salad dressing. Good nutrition on the inside can be just as important for strong and healthy hair in the long run.

Advertisements

6 Tips for Shiny Healthier Hair

shunme

If you are one of the billions of women who want shiner hair, you are certainly not alone! After all, glossy or shiny hair can make you look and feel like a princess. While everyone wants healthy hair shine, there are many things which can make your hair look dull.  Lack of vitamins, chemical color damage and heat damage are a few of the most common dull-hair culprits. If shiner hair is what you crave, use these easy beauty tips to help you learn how to turn lifeless hair into glossy, long locks!

Use heat activated  shampoo If you are a slave to your hair  dryer or flat iron, it’s important to start using heat activated  shampoo every day. Heat activated shampoo can protect your hair from  any damage a flat iron or other hair tool can cause.

  • Deep condition  weekly Whether your hair is normal, fine  or thick, it’s important for you to use a deep conditioner once a  week to help your hair maintain its lusciousness. To help you  remember to do this, choose a day of the week and stick to it. For  example, most people choose to deep condition on Saturday. This is  often because they have a little extra time on the weekend to spend  in the shower. You can get a very inexpensive conditioner product  called “Cholesterol” at most beauty stores, which is highly  effective and will leave you with a cocoa butter scent. You simply  apply it to your hair, leave it on for ten minutes and then shampoo  and condition as normal.
  • Try natural rinse  techniques If your hair is light colored,  try to boost its silky appearance by putting a few tablespoons of  lemon juice into your rinse water, for a natural shine boost. If  your hair is dark, mix apple cider vinegar into the rinse water for  similar results.
  • Use a homemade  hair care mask To get an effective mask  you won’t find at even the fanciest salons, grab eight  strawberries and a little mayonnaise. Start by mashing the berries  with one tablespoon of mayo. Then massage the mixture into your wet  hair after you wash it. Place a shower cap over it and wrap your  hair in a warm towel. Allow it to sit for ten minutes, then wash,  shampoo and condition as usual.
  • Get a hair cut Sometimes hair looks dull and dingy because it needs a trim. For  professional results, hit the salon and ask for your dull ends to be  removed. If it has been a long time since you’ve had a trim,  chances are you’ll need to lose a few inches.
  • Turn to trusted  products Products like a hair serum by  companies like Neutrogena are often a great way to add shine to your  hair. However, keep in mind if you want a shiny and sleek style,  it’s important not to overdo it on the products you do use every  day. Product buildup can quickly dull your hair’s natural shine.  Remember, if you have fine hair it’s important to look for  products with wheat proteins or polymers, because they will make  your hair look thicker. Those with normal hair should look for  products with silk amino acids, which will add shine and soften your  hair structure. If your hair is thick or coarse, pomades will be  able to add great shine.

What Is Disulfide Bond?

In chemistry, a disulfide bond is a covalent bond, usually derived by the coupling of two thiol groups. The linkage is also called an SS-bond or disulfide bridge. The overall connectivity is therefore R–S–S–R. The terminology is widely used in biochemistry. In formal terms, the connection is a persulfide, in analogy to its congener, peroxide, but this terminology is obscure and is no longer used.

disilfidebond

disulfide bond

n.

The covalent bond between sulfur atoms that binds two peptide chains or different parts of one peptide chain and is a structuraldeterminant in many protein molecules.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

bond

[bond]

the linkage between atoms or radicals of a chemical compound, or the symbol representing this linkage and indicating the number andattachment of the valencies of an atom in constitutional formulas, represented by a pair of dots or a line between atoms, e.g., H—O—H, H—C≡C—H or H:O:H, H:C:::C:H.
coordinate covalent bond a covalent bond in which one of the bonded atoms furnishes both of the shared electrons.
covalent bond a chemical bond between two atoms or radicals formed by the sharing of a pair (single bond), two pairs (double bond), orthree pairs of electrons (triple bond).
disulfide bond a strong covalent bond, —S—S—, important in linking polypeptide chains in proteins, the linkage arising as a result of theoxidation of the sulfhydryl (SH) groups of two molecules of cysteine.
high-energy phosphate bond an energy-rich phosphate linkage present in adenosine triphosphate (ATP), phosphocreatine, and certainother biological molecules. On hydrolysis at pH 7 it yields about 8000 calories per mole, in contrast to the 3000 calories yielded byphosphate esters. The bond stores energy that is used to drive biochemical processes, such as the synthesis of macromolecules,contraction of muscles, and the production of the electrical potentials for nerve conduction.
high-energy sulfur bond an energy-rich sulfur linkage, the most important of which occurs in the acetyl-CoA molecule, the main sourceof energy in fatty acid biosynthesis.
hydrogen bond a weak, primarily electrostatic, bond between a hydrogen atom bound to a highly electronegative element (such asoxygen or nitrogen) in a given molecule, or part of a molecule, and a second highly electronegative atom in another molecule or in adifferent part of the same molecule.
ionic bond a chemical bond in which electrons are transferred from one atom to another so that one bears a positive and the other anegative charge, the attraction between these opposite charges forming the bond.
peptide bond the —CO—NH— linkage formed between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of another; it is anamide linkage joining amino acids to form peptides.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bond

the linkage between atoms or radicals of a chemical compound, or the symbol representing this linkage and indicating the number andattachment of the valencies of an atom in constitutional formulas, e.g. H−O−H, H−C= C−H and can be represented by a pair of dotsbetween atoms, e.g. H:O:H, H:C:::C:H.

coordinate covalent bond

a covalent bond in which one of the bonded atoms furnishes both of the shared electrons.
covalent bond

a chemical bond between two atoms or radicals formed by the sharing of a pair (single bond), two pairs (double bond) or three pairsof electrons (triple bond).
disulfide bond

a strong covalent bond, −S−S−, important in linking polypeptide chains in proteins, the linkage arising as a result of the oxidation ofthe sulfhydryl (SH) groups of two molecules of cysteine.
high-energy phosphate bond

an energy-rich phosphate linkage present in adenosine triphosphate (ATP), phosphocreatine and certain other biological molecules.On hydrolysis at pH 7 it yields about 8000 calories per mole, in contrast to the 3000 calories yielded by phosphate esters. The bondstores energy that is used to drive biochemical processes, such as the synthesis of macromolecules, contraction of muscles, andthe production of the electrical potentials for nerve conduction.
high-energy sulfur bond

an energy-rich sulfur linkage, the most important of which occurs in the acetyl-CoA molecule, the main source of energy in fattyacid biosynthesis.
human-animal bond

the psychological interdependence between humans and companion animals.
hydrogen bond

a weak, primarily electrostatic, bond between a hydrogen atom bound to a highly electronegative element (such as oxygen ornitrogen) in a given molecule, or part of a molecule, and a second highly electronegative atom in another molecule or in a differentpart of the same molecule.
ionic bond

a chemical bond in which electrons are transferred from one atom to another so that one bears a positive and the other a negativecharge, the attraction between these opposite charges forming the bond.
peptide bond

the −CO−NH− linkage formed between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of another; it is an amide linkagejoining amino acids to form peptides.
phosphoanhydride bond

a high energy bond present in ATP.
phosphodiester bond

links between nucleotides in nucleic acids.
Saunders Comprehensive Veterinary Dictionary, 3 ed. © 2007 Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved

di·sul·fide bond

a single bond between two sulfurs; specifically, the -S-S- link binding two peptide chains (or different parts of one peptide chain); alsooccurs as part of the molecule of the amino acid, cystine, and is important as a structural determinant in many peptide and proteinmolecules, for example, keratin, insulin, and oxytocin. A symmetric disulfide is R-S-S-R; R’-S-S-R is a mixed or asymmetric disulfide.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

di·sul·fide bond

(dī-sŭl’fīd bond)

A single bond between two sulfurs; specifically, the -S-S- link binding two peptide chains (or different parts of one peptide chain).
Synonym(s): disulphide bond.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012